Types of Wood Flooring Available from Ace Hardwood Floors:

All the pictures here have a natural sealer with the top half finished in a water based urethane and the bottom half in an oil based urethane. These are the best representations of wood grain and color, however different computers/monitors will display them differently and woods do vary in color and grain.
Appearance

Color: Heartwood is light tan to dark brown; sapwood is creamy white. Similar in appearance to white oak, but frequently more yellow.

Grain: Bold, straight, moderately open grain with occasional wavy figuring. Can have strong contrast in grain in plainsaw boards.

Variations within species and grades: Sometimes confused with hickory; the zone of large pores is more distinctive in ash, similar to that of red oak.
Appearance

Color: Heartwood is mostly reddish brown; sapwood is generally pale white

Grain: Mostly closed, straight grain; fine, uniform texture. Coarser than European beech.

Variations within species and grades: Only one species is native to the United States. Moderate to high color variation between boards.
Appearance

Color: In yellow birch, sapwood is creamy yellow or pale white; heartwood is light reddish brown tinged with red. In sweet birch, sapwood is light colored and heartwood is dark brown tinged with red.

Grain: Medium figuring, straight, closed grain, even texture. Ocassional curly grain or wavy figure in some boards.

Variations within species and grades: Yellow birch, sweet birch, paper birch. Paper birch is softer and lower in weight and strength than yellow or sweet birch. However, yellow birch is most commonly used for flooring. Boards can vary greatly in grain and color.
Appearance

Color: Heartwood is light to dark reddish brown, lustrous; sapwood is light brown to pale with a light pinkish tone. Some flooring manufacturers steam lumber to bleed the darker heartwood color into the sapwood, resulting in a more uniform color.

Grain: Fine, frequently wavy, uniform texture. Distinctive flake pattern on true quartersawn surfaces. Texure is satiny, with some gum pockets.

Variations within species and grades: Significant color variation between boards.
Appearance

Color: Heartwood is yellowish tan to light brown. Sapwood is tan to white. Heartwood may be confused with that of Southern yellow pine. Radical color change upon exposure to sunlight.

Grain: Normally straight, with occasional wavy or spiral texture. Nearly all fir flooring is vertical-grain or riftsaw clear-grade material.

Variations within species and grades: Wood varies greatly in weight and strength. Young trees of moderate to rapid growth have reddish heartwood and are called red fir. The narrow ringed wood of old trees may be yellowish brown and is known as yellow fir.
Appearance

Color: Heartwood is yellow after cutting and turns deep pinkish tan to warm reddish brown within weeks due to high resin content. Sapwood remains yellow, with occasional blue-black sap stains.

Grain: Dense, with high figuring. Plainsaw is swirled; rift or quartersawn is primarily pinstriped. Curly or burl grain is rare.

Variations within species and grades: Moderate color variation.
Appearance

Color: Pecan heartwood is reddish brown with dark stripes; sapwood is white or creamy white with pinkish tones. Hickory heartwood is tan or reddish; sapwood is white to cream, with fine brown lines.

Grain: Pecan is open, occasionally wavy or irregular, Hickory is closed, with moderate definition; with a somewhat rough texture.

Variations within species and grades: In both hickory and pecan, there are often pronounced differentiations in color between spring wood and summer wood. In pecan, sapwood is usually graded higher than darker heartwood. Pecan and hickory are traditionally mixed by flooring mills.
Appearance

Color: Heartwood is creamy white to light reddish brown; sapwood is pale to creamy white.

Grain: Closed, subdued grain, with medium figuring and uniform texture. Occasionally shows quilted, fiddleback, curly or bird's eye figuring. Figured boards often culled during grading and sold at a premium.

Variations within species and grades: Black maple is also hard; other species are classified as soft.
Appearance

Color: Light brown to dark reddish brown.

Grain: High in character, with ingrown bark and mineral streaks. Most commonly used in flooring as end-grain block, which has small irregular cracks radiating across the grain.

Variations within species and grades: One grade; moderate color variations.
Appearance

Color: Heartwood and sapwood are similar, with sapwood lighter in color; most pieces have a reddish tone. Slightly redder than white oak.

Grain: Open, slightly coarser than white oak. Plainsaw boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftsawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quartersawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger rays or butterflies.

Variations within species and grades: More than 200 subspecies in North America; great variation in color grain. depending on the origin of the wood and corresponding differences in growing seasons. Northern, Southern and Appalachian red oak can all be divided into upland and lowland species.
Appearance

Color: Heartwood is light brown; some boards may have a pinkish tint or a slightly grayish cast. Sapwood is white to cream.

Grain: Open, with longer rays than red oak. Occasionally crotches, swirls and burls. Plainsawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quartersawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger rays or butterflies.

Variations within species and grades: Considerable variation among boards in color and grain texture, but variations not as pronounced as in red oak.
Appearance

Color: Heartwood varies from light yellow/orange to reddish brown or yellowish brown; sapwood is light tan to yellowish white.

Grain: Closed, with high figuring; patterns range from clear to knotty.

Variations within species and grades: Longleaf pine, shortleaf pine, loblolloy pine, slash pine. All have many of the same characteristics as Douglas fir. Old-growth lumber in these varieties has substantially higher density and is more stable than second-growth material.
Appearance

Color: Heartwood ranges from a deep, rich dark brown to a purplish black. Sapwood is nearly white to tan. Difference between heartwood and sapwood color is great; some flooring manufacturers steam lumber to bleed the darker heartwood color into the sapwood, resulting in a more uniform color.

Grain: Mostly straight and open, but some boards have burled or curly grain. Arrangement of pores is similar to hickories and persimmon, but pores are smaller in size.

Variations within species and grades: Great variety of color and figure within species, as well as variation in color among boards, especially in lower grades and from material that isn't steamed prior to kiln drying.
Appearance

Color: Sapwood is gray-white; heartwood is salmon red to orange-brown when fresh, and becomes russet or reddish brown when seasoned; often marked with dark streaks.

Grain: Mostly interlocked; texture is medium to rather coarse.

Variations within species and grades: Moderate to high color variation.
Appearance

Color: Cream-colored sapwood; heartwood is honey-gold to brown with darker knots throughout.

Grain: Closed.

Variations within species and grades: High degree of color variability.
Appearance

Color: Heartwood is uniformly pinkish to dark red, often rich, dark red mahogany hue, turning a deep brownish red with age and exposure; sapwood is pale. Frequently black streaks with occasional ingrown grain.

Grain: Frequently interlocked or wavy. Texture is even and moderately coarse.

Variations within species and grades: Moderate to high color variation.
Appearance

Color: Dark reddish brown.

Grain: Striped figuring in quartersawn selections; texture is even and very fine.

Variations within species and grades: Moderate color variation.
Appearance

Color: Heartwood is yellowish to orange-brown when freshly cut, turning brown to dark red-brown upon exposure.

Grain: Straight to interlocked or wavyl coarse texture.

Variations within species and grades: Moderate to high variation in color.
Appearance

Color: Heartwood is vivid reddish orange when freshly cut, darkening to reddish or purple-brown or black over time. Sapwood is cream-colored. Very uniform in color.

Grain: Straight to interlocked; coarse texture.

Variations within species and grades: Slight variation in color.
Appearance

Color: Heartwood is brown when freshly cut, turning deep purple to purplish brown over time. Sapwood is a lighter cream color.

Grain: Usually straight; medium to fine texture.

Variations within species and grades: Moderate to high color variation.
Appearance

Color: Heartwood varies from yellow-brown to dark golden brown; turns rich brown under exposure to sunlight. Sapwood is a lighter cream color.

Grain: Straight; coarse, uneven texure.

Variations within species and grades: Moderate to high color variation.
Appearance

Color: Heartwood is yellow-brown when freshly cut, turning dark brown to almost black with alternate layers of light and dark. Sapwood is yellowish-white and clearly demarcated from heartwood.

Grain: Straight when quartersawn; coarse texture.

Variations within species and grades: Moderate variation in color.

 

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